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Minnesota Bluegrass August Festival  

August 6 - 9, 2020 • El Rancho Mañana, Richmond, MN | ​Nominated IBMA Event of the Year FIVE Times!


ABOUT THE 2020 BANDS


2020 Headliner: Sam Bush

`<img alt="Sam Bush playing the Violin on stage"`>

There was only one prize-winning teenager carrying stones big enough to say thanks, but no thanks to Roy Acuff. Only one son of Kentucky finding a light of inspiration from Bill Monroe and his Blue Grass Boys and catching a fire from Bob Marley and The Wailers. Only one progressive hippie allying with like-minded conspirators, rolling out the New Grass revolution, and then leaving the genre’s torch-bearing band behind as it reached its commercial peak.

There is only one consensus pick of peers and predecessors, of the traditionalists, the rebels, and the next gen devotees. Music’s ultimate inside outsider. Or is it outside insider? There is only one Sam Bush.

On a Bowling Green, Kentucky cattle farm in the post-war 1950s, Bush grew up an only son, and with four sisters. His love of music came immediately, encouraged by his parents’ record collection and, particularly, by his father Charlie, a fiddler, who organized local jams. Charlie envisioned his son someday a staff fiddler at the Grand Ole Opry, but a clear day’s signal from Nashville brought to Bush’s television screen a tow-headed boy named Ricky Skaggs playing mandolin with Flatt and Scruggs, and an epiphany for Bush. At 11, he purchased his first mandolin.

As a teen fiddler Bush was a three-time national champion in the junior division of the National Oldtime Fiddler’s Contest. He recorded an instrumental album, Poor Richard’s Almanac as a high school senior and in the spring of 1970 attended the Fiddlers Convention in Union Grove, NC. There he heard the New Deal String Band, taking notice of their rock-inspired brand of progressive bluegrass.

Acuff offered him a spot in his band. Bush politely turned down the country titan. It was not the music he wanted to play. He admired the grace of Flatt &amp; Scruggs, loved Bill Monroe- even saw him perform at the Ryman- but he’d discovered electrified alternatives to tradition in the Osborne Brothers and manifest destiny in The Dillards.

See the photo of a fresh-faced Sam Bush in his shiny blue high school graduation gown, circa 1970. Tufts of blonde hair breaking free of the borders of his squared cap, Bush is smiling, flanked by his proud parents. The next day he was gone, bound for Los Angeles. He got as far as his nerve would take him- Las Vegas- then doubled back to Bowling Green.

“I started working at the Holiday Inn as a busboy,” Bush recalls. “Ebo Walker and Lonnie Peerce came in one night asking if I wanted to come to Louisville and play five nights a week with the Bluegrass Alliance. That was a big, ol’ ‘Hell yes, let’s go.’”

Bush played guitar in the group, then began playing mandolin after recruiting guitarist Tony Rice to the fold. Following a fallout with Peerce in 1971, Bush and his Alliance mates- Walker, Courtney Johnson, and Curtis Burch- formed the New Grass Revival, issuing the band’s debut, New Grass Revival. Walker left soon after, replaced temporarily by Butch Robins, with the quartet solidifying around the arrival of bassist John Cowan.

“There were already people that had deviated from Bill Monroe’s style of bluegrass,” Bush explains. “If anything, we were reviving a newgrass style that had already been started. Our kind of music tended to come from the idea of long jams and rock-&amp;-roll songs.”

Shunned by some traditionalists, New Grass Revival played bluegrass fests slotted in late-night sets for the “long-hairs and hippies.” Quickly becoming a favorite of rock audiences, they garnered the attention of Leon Russell, one of the era’s most popular artists. Russell hired New Grass as his supporting act on a massive tour in 1973 that put the band nightly in front of tens of thousands.

At tour’s end, it was back to headlining six nights a week at an Indiana pizza joint. But, they were resilient, grinding it out on the road. And in 1975 the Revival first played Telluride, Colorado, forming a connection with the region and its fans that has prospered for 45 years.

Bush was the newgrass commando, incorporating a variety of genres into the repertoire. He discovered a sibling similarity with the reggae rhythms of Marley and The Wailers, and, accordingly, developed an ear-turning original style of mandolin playing. The group issued five albums in their first seven years, and in 1979 became Russell’s backing band. By 1981, Johnson and Burch left the group, replaced by banjoist Bela Fleck and guitarist Pat Flynn.

A three-record contract with Capitol Records and a conscious turn to the country market took the Revival to new commercial heights. Bush survived a life-threatening bout with cancer, and returned to the group that’d become more popular than ever. They released chart-climbing singles, made videos, earned Grammy nominations, and, at their zenith, called it quits.

“We were on the verge of getting bigger,” recalls Bush. “Or maybe we’d gone as far as we could. I’d spent 18 years in a four-piece partnership. I needed a break. But, I appreciated the 18 years we had.”

Bush worked the next five years with Emmylou Harris’ Nash Ramblers, then a stint with Lyle Lovett. He took home three-straight IBMA Mandolin Player of the Year awards, 1990-92, (and a fourth in 2007). In 1995 he reunited with Fleck, now a burgeoning superstar, and toured with the Flecktones, reigniting his penchant for improvisation. Then, finally, after a quarter-century of making music with New Grass Revival and collaborating with other bands, Sam Bush went solo.

He’s released seven albums and a live DVD over the past two decades. In 2009, the Americana Music Association awarded Bush the Lifetime Achievement Award for Instrumentalist. Punch Brothers, Steep Canyon Rangers, and Greensky Bluegrass are just a few present-day bluegrass vanguards among so many musicians he’s influenced. His performances are annual highlights of the festival circuit, with Bush’s joyous perennial appearances at the town’s famed bluegrass fest earning him the title, “King of Telluride.”

“With this band I have now I am free to try anything. Looking back at the last 50 years of playing newgrass, with the elements of jazz improvisation and rock-&amp;-roll, jamming, playing with New Grass Revival, Leon, and Emmylou; it’s a culmination of all of that,” says Bush. “I can unapologetically stand onstage and feel I’m representing those songs well.”

2020 Headliner: Special Consensus

`<img alt="Picture of the Band, Special Consensus, 4 men with a variety of instruments"`>The Special Consensus is a bluegrass band that has achieved a contemporary sound in their four decades of performing, making their music a modern classic. The band is led by Greg Cahill, banjo player and recipient of the prestigious Distinguished Achievement Award from the International Bluegrass Music Association (IBMA), and includes Rick Faris (guitar), Dan Eubanks (bass) and Nate Burie (mandolin). Special Consensus has received five awards from the IBMA and two Grammy nominations. They are four talented vocalists and instrumentalists who follow their creative desires without straying too far from their bluegrass roots. The 19th band recording, Rivers and Roads (Compass Records, 2018), was nominated for the 2018 Best Bluegrass Album GRAMMY award and received 2018 IBMA awards for Album of the Year and Instrumental Recorded Performance of the Year (for the tune “Squirrel Hunters”).



2020 Headliner: Sideline

`<img alt="Picutre of the Band Sideline, 6 men with a variety of instruments"`>

Sideline is a pedigreed six-piece powerhouse whose style has set the pace in Bluegrass for over two decades. Founders Steve Dilling (banjo), guitarist Skip Cherryholmes and Jason Moore (bass) can all claim their own historical significance to the genre as members of highly awarded groups, multiple Grand Ole Opry appearances and years of national and international touring. What started as a side project for the seasoned players soon moved to the front and center and they began to record and release albums in earnest. In 2019, Sideline won the IBMA Song Of The Year Award for their hit single, "Thunder Dan."

To listen to Sideline reminds the fan of why so many people fall in love with Bluegrass in the first place; pulse-pounding drive, songs sung from the heart, perfected timing and dynamics as well as a visceral emotion in the rendering. A band that was started as an off-season fun experiment has become a full-time dream team of players and singers, including its latest additions, Zack Arnold (mandolin), Jamie Harper (fiddle) and guitarist Jacob Greer.

Whether live or in the studio, the sextet moves dynamically from well chosen, hard-hitting neo-traditional covers of classic songs to new material, all curated by a band with a perfect sense of who they are and what they have to say. Combine all this with their on-stage energy and finesse as well as their powerful and affecting harmonies, and you have the embodiment of the North Carolina Bluegrass sound. Sideline has released 5 national projects and records for the highly awarded Mountain Home Music Company based near Asheville, NC

2020 Headliner: Caleb Daugherty Band

`<img alt="Picture of the Band The Caleb Daugherty Band, 5 men in this band"`>

The Caleb Daugherty Band is based out of central Indiana. The band’s sound has been generated from deep bluegrass roots and a love for country music. Members of the band are lead vocalist and guitar player Caleb Daugherty, Zion Napier on mandolin and vocals, Kyle Clerkin on banjo and vocals, Zach Collier on bass and vocals, and Kyle Ramey on Fiddle. Caleb Daugherty released a self-titled country album in 2017 with Chris Keefe on KDM records and is currently working on another country album. The Caleb Daugherty Band is set to release their first bluegrass album very soon. Caleb Daugherty’s smooth lead vocals and the bands hot pickin’ is sure to have audiences swaying and tapping their toes.


2020 Headliner: Valerie Smith & Liberty Pike

`<img alt="Picture of Valerie Smith and Liberty Pike, 2 Woman and 3 men with a variety of instruments"`>

Valerie Smith has developed a unique style and sound that has rocked the bluegrass world for almost two decades with a string of national and international tours, critically acclaimed recordings, and Grammy, IBMA and Dove Award nominations. Val's vocals are impressive. She has a staggeringly expansive range and the ability to portray an amazing array of emotion. As NPR radio host Dave Higgs, has noted, "She can be sassy, sultry, siren-like, sweet, smooth, soothing and smoldering---sometimes during the span of just one song!" Valerie Smith and her East Coast-based band, Liberty Pike featuring legendary Hall of  Famer , Tom Gray on bass, are consistent audience pleasers and skilled musicians. When Valerie walks onstage with her fabulous band, expect to be inspired, amused and thoroughly entertained.

2020 Headliner: Jim & Lynna Woolsey

`<img alt="Picture of Jim & Lynna Woosley, 3 men and 1 woman with a variety of insstruments"`>

Jim has been playing bluegrass music since he was 15 years old. He started playing guitar and singing lead vocals in a local band, The Patoka Valley Boys and has continued performing in various bands since then. He has been writing songs even longer. He wrote his first song at the tender age of three and has written hundreds of songs since. As a single act or in a band, Jim has shared the stage with acts like The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band.

He and his wife Lynna started their career together shortly after they married. Lynna started performing at 4 years old in church and then bluegrass when she met Jim. They write, sing and perform all original material. Jim and Lynna have received various Bluegrass awards for Old Time Vocals, Guitar, Mandolin, and have garnered several band titles.  These include a first place trophy for the Kentucky Fried Chicken Talent Hunt and a first place title in the Indiana Picking and Fiddling Contest with their band, Fields of Home, two years in a row. Jim and Lynna have performed together at the Bluebird Café and the World-famous Station Inn venues in Nashville, Tennessee, Goldie’s Opera House in Owensboro, Kentucky.





Minnesota Bluegrass & Old-Time Music Association
P.O. Box 16408, Minneapolis, MN 55416

info@minnesotabluegrass.org
651-456-8919

Our Mission: To preserve and promote bluegrass and old-time stringband music in and around the state of Minnesota.


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